Whole Food, Vegetable-based Diet Helps Cure Cancer, Heart Disease, Diabetes, and Obesity.

china study docmisty Whole Food, Vegetable based Diet Helps Cure Cancer, Heart Disease, Diabetes, and Obesity.

Reading The China Study was probably the big turning point in our family’s diet and health a little over 3 years ago. 

We had big reasons to be looking for ways to be more healthy.

Here are 3 of them:

1.  Tom was looking at open heart surgery to replace a congenitally defective heart valve along with replacing a section of his aorta that went past the arteries up supplying the brain = they would freeze him down and stop blood flow to the brain for a time while they fixed both problems = very scary to both of us and our 4 young children.  He would then have an artificial valve that was only supposed to last 10 years or so before needing to be replaced.  He also has genetically high cholesterol.

2.  I had severe heartburn that had increased with each pregnancy.  The GI scope showed damage and the specialist said I should increase my once a day prescription to twice a day. 

“For how long?”  I asked.  (What do you think he said?)

“For the rest of your life,” he said. (I was in my mid-30s)

“Is there anything else I can do?  Any diet or lifestyle changes?” (What do you think he said this time?)

“Nope.  With a severe case like yours, you need to take 2 pills a day, for the rest of your life.”

3.  Tim, our 4th, had been rushed to the hospital only able to breath by screaming non-stop.  He had viral-induced asthma.  So, any time he got a cold, it would move to a cough, then his airways would swell, he would have trouble breathing, we would give him Albuterol, which wouldn’t work well enough, so he would be put on steroids.  After the hospital and 2 repeat episodes of the above sequence, they put him on a once a day asthma drug . . . indefinitely.  The doctor said he might outgrow the condition when he was 5 or so.  He was still a baby.

We switched to eating predominantly a vegan diet with an emphasis on whole foods - brown rice, whole wheat flour, fruits, and vegetables, etc.

The results:

  1. Tom’s cholesterol dropped significantly the first few months.  His new heart valve is doing very well and we hope that on this diet it will last longer than the average of 10 years.
  2. I’m off ALL my heartburn prescriptions.  I occasionally need an antacid after eating tomato or chocolate (or the now and then pizza)
  3. After being vegan for a while and a few colds without breathing trouble, I stopped giving Tim his medication and he’s never had trouble since.  When I mentioned to the doctor that diet might be why he was doing so well, she said our success was probably because we hadn’t been through the cold and flu season yet.  He was 1 then.  He’s 4 now, and still not a single whiff of lung trouble since.  That’s 3 cold and flu seasons.

A few of the things that stood out to me the first time I read The China Study:

  • A study where they gave a peanut mold toxin that would cause liver cancer to 2 sets of rats.  One they fed on veggie protein and one of dairy protein.  The dairy group developed liver cancer while the veggie group hardly did.  And even more amazing, they switched the diets and the cancer shrunk in the previously dairy group and began to develop in the previously veggie group.
  • The comparison of poor versus rich diets = veggie/grain versus meat/dairy and the poor versus rich illnesses = diarrheal/infections/etc. versus heart/cancer/diabetes.
  • An image in the book of a before-and-after image of a man’s artery - very clogged and then incredibly open.  He was a man who didn’t accept that his heart disease diagnosis was forever and all he could do was take handfuls of pills for the rest of his life.  He discovered the whole foods/vegetable based diet, stuck to it despite considerable ridicule from those around him, and reversed his heart disease.  A drug doing this kind of thing would be hailed as a miracle saving millions of lives from the #1 killer in America.  It’s DIET guys, NOT drugs!
  • The studies.  The studies.  The studies.
  • The results.
  • The simplicity.
  • The logic.
  • The hope.

I know some may have objections or disagree with portions of The China Study, but really, where’s the possible harm?  If it even has a tiny chance of helping with the big killers in our society, why wouldn’t you give it a try?  Are we really so attached to eating meat, dairy, and eggs? 

I believe the science supports eating this way.  Common sense supports eating this way.  Our family’s results support eating this way. 

I just wanted to share and hope this would help encourage others to take the leap and see how it helps their health.

Enjoy!

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7 comments to Whole Food, Vegetable-based Diet Helps Cure Cancer, Heart Disease, Diabetes, and Obesity.

  • Giovanna,

    I agree. When we first switched to vegan, I was looking for substitutes because it was such a big change in our diet and how to prepare food. As I’ve learned more, I’m definitely much more of a ‘whole food-ist’. I wasn’t happy simply trading all my meat and cheese for highly processed soy products, especially since I also have kidney stones (run in the family) and highly processed soy is high in oxalates. We have very little of the processed products left in our diet.

    But, as in most of our food choices, we don’t stress about the small stuff. We shoot for 90-95% whole food vegetable based diet and don’t worry about the occasional condiment or snack. I also don’t worry about what we eat socially and let the kids have whatever they want at parties and other people’s houses. I don’t want our diet to make them feel ostracized, and at some point they’ll be making their own diet choices anyway, so this gives them a chance to choose for themselves.

    I haven’t tried miso, though, so thanks for the suggestion. I’ll have to look up what to do with it.

    Misty

  • Giovanna

    I would be careful eating all of that processed food in place of meat and dairy! They are not “whole foods”.

    Dairy and meat “substitutes” are processed foods just like sugar cereal is. If mother nature didn’t create it, your body won’t recognize it as food.

    Processed soy especially has been linked to health problems (soy milk, soy cheese, soy meats, soy formula, soy products in junk food). And I’ve found more than a couple cream cheese substitutes that had partially hydrogenated oils in them!

    Regular soy cooked well (tofu, tempeh) or fermented soy (miso) seem to be much better or even beneficial. Especially miso!

  • Flexitarian! LOL! I’ll have to remember that. I think we’re also pretty flexitarian, at least on social occasions like church functions, birthday parties, etc. You’ll have to let me know how it goes!

  • Charlotte

    Just read the China Study. We’re going flexitarian (my dad’s a cattle rancher–it would be better to be dead than to stop eating beef completely)

  • Hi Charlotte!

    Thanks for the nice comment!

    I admit we all miss cheese sometimes, but there are great substitutes for many other dairy items. We use avocado on Mexican food instead of cheese. You can crumble some potato chips on top of casseroles. There is a brand called “Better than Sour Cream” and “Better than Cream Cheese” that we get at Kroger or Trader Joe. They are veggie oil based. You can use some ground almond meal mixed with spices and/or some nutritional yeast as a parmesan sprinkle. There are decent soy yougurts, and the big container of Silk Soy yogurt is $3 at Meijer. But, we haven’t really found a decent substitute for cheese and we still have a pizza now and then.

    For meat we just leave it out and add a can of beans, sauted mushrooms, soy crumbles, or more veggies to the dish. An all-veggie chili is a good place to start – you can put lots of different kinds of beans, onions, pepper varieties, corn, tomato, and spices. Mexican food is also easy to convert. Take a tortilla add some rice, beans, salsa, avocado, black olives, shredded lettuce, and some chopped tomato, and you really don’t notice that the meat and cheese are missing.

    Good luck and enjoy!

  • Charlotte

    Wow! I didn’t know about Tim. That’s incredible. Also incredible that doctors didn’t believe in the power of diet. Congratulations!! I’ve been weaned from milk…I wonder if I can wean my family.

  • Cindy

    Misty,

    Check this blog out…
    http://veganmothering.blogspot.com/

    And did you see there is a movie about it coming out?
    http://forksoverknives.com/

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